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NCJ Number: 214649 Find in a Library
Title: Bruising in the Geriatric Population
Author(s): Laura Mosqueda M.D.; Kerry Burnight Ph.D.; Solomon Liao M.D.
Corporate Author: University of California, Irvine College of Medicine
Program in Geriatrics
United States of America
Date Published: June 2006
Page Count: 22
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
University of California, Irvine College of Medicine
Orange, CA 92868
Grant Number: 2001-IJ-CX-K014
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Document - Designates non-commercial publications, such as Government and gray literature reports.
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the occurrence, progression, and resolution of accidental bruising in a sample of adults ages 65 and older, in order to provide a knowledge base for the comparative identification of abusive bruising of elderly individuals.
Abstract: The findings indicate that accidental bruises occur in a predictable pattern in older adults. Nearly 90 percent of the accidental bruises were on the extremities; not a single accidental bruise was found on the neck, ears, genitals, buttocks, or soles of the feet. Although location was a significant factor in the characteristics of accidental bruises, initial color and color change over time were less distinctive. Individuals on medications known to have an influence on bruising were more likely to have multiple bruises. Also, those with physical disabilities were more likely to have multiple bruises. The study involved 101 subjects recruited from 3 community living settings and 2 skilled nursing facilities in Orange County, CA. The study sample was 66 percent female with an average age of 83. Forty-five percent of the participants required assistance with one or more activities of daily living. Each day over the period of the study, a trained interviewer examined each participant from head-to-toe for any bruises. If a bruise was present at the first visit, it was documented and excluded from the study. Any bruises that appeared on the second to the 14th day were documented and monitored until resolution or up to 6 weeks. Subjects and/or caregivers were asked what caused the bruise. Bruise characteristics documented were location, size, and color. Each bruise was re-examined at the same time each day. Data recorded for participants were age, gender, ethnicity, functional status, whether right-handed or left-handed, medical conditions, medications, cognitive status, depression, and history of falls. 3 tables, 3 figures, and 17 notes
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Crimes against the elderly; Elder Abuse; Elderly victims; Institutional elder abuse; Medical evaluation; NIJ final report
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=236206

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