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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 214753   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
  Title: Investigation and Prosecution of Homicide Cases in the U.S.: The Process for Federal Involvement
  Document URL: PDF 
  Author(s): Phyllis J. Newton ; Candace M. Johnson ; Timothy M. Mulcahy
  Corporate Author: National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
United States of America
  Date Published: 2006
  Page Count: 136
  Annotation: This research builds on earlier studies conducted by the Department of Justice (DOJ) that focused on the federal death penalty system. It responds directly to a call for research into the process by which homicide cases are investigated and how and why some of those cases enter the federal system and others enter the state system.
  Abstract: This research builds on earlier studies conducted by the Department of Justice (DOJ) that focused on the federal death penalty system. It responds directly to a call for research into the process by which homicide cases are investigated and how and why some of those cases enter the federal system and others enter the state system. The findings make clear that no one factor likely predicts whether homicide cases are brought to the federal system. Instead, the findings suggest a framework that organizes the myriad factors that influence decision-making into two categories: openness that is influenced by expertise, capabilities, and track record; and coordination and interaction that is influenced by task forces and other mutually beneficial relationships reinforced by shared crime concerns and respect. Using qualitative research techniques, this study examined the processes by which criminal cases, especially homicide cases, entered the federal criminal justice system. The research plan called for ten districts, which were selected purposefully and should not be considered representative of the 94 federal districts. Researchers visited nine federal districts and interviewed federal, state, and local investigators, prosecutors, and defense attorneys who potentially played a role in determining whether homicide cases were investigated and prosecuted in the state or federal systems. The findings in this report are limited to the first four districts analyzed. These districts are geographically diverse, with and without state capital provisions, and sent among the highest and lowest number of cases to DOJ for capital consideration during the study reference period, 1995-2000.
  Main Term(s): Homicide ; Courts
  Index Term(s): Homicide ; Federal courts ; State courts ; Prosecution ; Investigations ; Courts ; Death investigations
  Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
  Grant Number: 2002-IJ-CX-4021
  Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
  Type: Research Paper
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
  Note: Public access to the Technical Report and select appendices is restricted.
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=236312

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