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NCJ Number: NCJ 230758   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
Title: Community-Based Violence Prevention: An Assessment of Pittsburgh's One Vision One Life Program
Author(s): Jeremy M. Wilson ; Steven Chermak ; Edmund F. McGarrell
Corporate Author: Rand Corporation
United States of America
Date Published: 2010
Page Count: 186
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2006-IJ-CX-0030
Publication Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4993-3
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Program/Project Description ; Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This monograph assesses the implementation and impact of the One Vision One Life violence-prevention strategy in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Abstract: In 2003, Pittsburgh witnessed a 49-percent increase in homicides, prompting a “grassroots” creation and implementation of the One Vision One Life antiviolence strategy. This initiative used a problem-solving, data-driven model, including street-level intelligence, to intervene in escalating disputes, and seeks to place youth in appropriate social programs. Analysis of the program, which is modeled on similar efforts elsewhere, can help inform other efforts to address urban violence and should be of interest to policymakers, practitioners, communities, and researchers interested in preventing violence and understanding the dynamics of a violence-prevention initiative. In 2006, more than 6 million individuals were victimized by violent crimes in the United States. Although violence is below levels of the early 1990s, it remains high. The extent of violence and its impact highlight a critical need to develop and implement effective programs to reduce violence and victimization. Communities have initiated a wide range of such programs, and scholars have conducted numerous evaluations of varying quality of them. Reviews have found certain types of strategies and specific programs to be promising, but additional critical evaluations are needed to plan violence-reduction programs.
Main Term(s): Violence prevention
Index Term(s): Violence ; Victimization ; Crime prevention measures ; Urban criminality ; Violence causes ; Victims of violence ; Violence prediction ; Community Responses (crime prevention)
Note: This research is the product of a joint collaboration between the RAND Corporation and Michigan State University and supported by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, and by the Richard King Mellon Foundation. This research builds on previous RAND work pertaining to community-based violence-prevention efforts.
   
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