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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 232102     Find in a Library
  Title: Information Sharing in Criminal Justice-Mental Health Collaborations: Working with HIPAA and Other Privacy Laws
  Document URL: PDF 
  Author(s): John Petrila, J.D., L.L.M. ; Hallie Fader-Towe, J.D.
  Corporate Author: Council of State Governments Justice Ctr
United States of America
  Date Published: 2010
  Page Count: 46
  Annotation: In understanding that the legal framework of information sharing is the crucial first step for jurisdictions seeking to design and implement effective criminal justice-mental health collaborations, this guide introduces how Federal and State laws likely influence practitioners’ responses, specifically in reference to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability act of 1996 (HIPPA) and other privacy laws.
  Abstract: Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented at every stage of the criminal justice process. In response, many jurisdictions have developed a range of policy and programmatic responses that depend on collaboration among the criminal justice, mental health, and substance abuse treatment systems. A critical component of this collaboration is information sharing, particularly about the health and treatment of people with mental illnesses. However, legal and technical barriers often prevent a smooth exchange of information among these systems. Understanding the legal framework of information sharing is the crucial first step for jurisdictions seeking to design and implement effective criminal justice-mental health collaborations. This guide, supported by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice of Assistance, supports that first step by introducing how Federal and State laws are likely to influence practitioners’ responses. Federal law shapes what is permissible at the State or local level, primarily through the basic privacy rules for “protected health information” under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA) and other privacy laws. The guide is organized into two parts. The first part focuses on each type of practitioner likely to be involved in criminal justice-mental health collaboration: behavioral health care, law enforcement, courts, jail and prison, and probation and parole. The second part, “Working with Privacy Laws” provides practical advice on the enforcement of HIPAA and other privacy laws. Notes
  Main Term(s): Mentally ill offenders
  Index Term(s): Interagency cooperation ; Federal regulations ; Mental health services ; State regulations ; Inmate health care ; Criminal justice system coordination ; Mentally ill inmates ; Special needs offenders ; Healthcare ; BJA grant-related documents
  Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Assistance
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
  Grant Number: 2008-MO-BX-K002
  Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Bureau of Justice Assistance Clearinghouse
P.O. Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
  Type: Issue Overview
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=254182

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