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NCJ Number: NCJ 232623   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
Title: Course of Domestic Abuse among Chicago's Elderly: Risk Factors, Protective Behaviors, and Police Intervention
Author(s): Karen L. Amendola, Ph.D. ; Meghan G. Slipka, M.A. ; Edwin E. Hamilton, M.A., A.B.D. ; Julie L. Whitman, M.S.W. MSW
Corporate Author: Police Foundation
United States of America

National Ctr for Victims of Crime
United States of America
Date Published: 2010
Page Count: 132
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2005-WG-BX-0012
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Using a stratified sample of Chicago’s elderly population, this study examined if and how risk factors and protective behaviors influence the course of elder abuse over time, the prevalence rates for various types of abuse, and the police role in intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect.
Abstract: The examination of the course of abuse found that victims from the police sample (elderly victims who had been visited by trained domestic violence/senior citizen victimization officers in the Chicago Police Department) were more likely to have at least one incident of subsequent abuse compared to those from the community sample (elderly victims who experienced no police intervention); however, for those in the police sample, the number of forms of abuse that occurred repeatedly decreased. In addition, those in the police sample were more likely to have engaged in protective behaviors or service seeking than those in the community sample. These findings suggest that intervention by officers trained to assist elder abuse victims can lead to increased engagement in protective behaviors and ultimately reduction in the number of frequently occurring forms of abuse. The sample consisted of 1,795 elderly residents for whom researchers could identify victimization status. In-depth interviews were conducted with 328 elderly residents from three sample groups: 159 community nonvictims, 121 community victims, and 48 victims who received police intervention. All participants were current residents of Chicago, ages 60 and over. Researchers conducted phone interviews with a survey instrument designed to assess victimization. The survey included questions about various characteristics and risk factors associated with both victims and perpetrators of abuse and/or neglect, specific types of abuse, and victims’ protective behaviors. Victimization was examined twice over a 10-month period in order to assess the course of abuse over time. The effects of police intervention were also examined. 31 tables, 61 references, and appended study instruments
Main Term(s): Police domestic violence training
Index Term(s): Crimes against the elderly ; Elder Abuse ; Elderly victims ; Elderly victim services ; NIJ final report ; Illinois
Note: See NCJ-232625 for the executive summary.
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=254711

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