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NCJ Number: 248339 Find in a Library
Title: Crimes Against the Elderly, 2003-2013
Series: BJS Special Reports
Author(s): Rachel Morgan Ph.D.; Erika Harrell
Corporate Author: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Date Published: November 2014
Page Count: 24
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Washington, DC 20531
Document: Agency Summary|PDF|Text
Agency Summary: http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5136 
Type: Issue Overview; Statistics
Format: Document; Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) report presents estimates on property and fatal and nonfatal violent victimization against persons age 65 or older from 2003 to 2013.
Abstract: This report presents estimates on property and fatal and nonfatal violent victimization against persons age 65 or older from 2003 to 2013. The report examines patterns of victimization over time and the distribution of violent victimization by the victim-offender relationship, victim 's disability status, victim and incident characteristics, reporting to police, injuries sustained during the victimization, and identity theft victimization against the elderly. Nonfatal violent and property victimization data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey and homicide data are from mortality data based on death certificates in the National Vital Statistics System of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Highlights of this report include: 1) the rates of nonfatal violent crime (3.6 per 1,000 persons) and property crime (72.3 per 1,000) against elderly persons were lower than those of younger persons; 2) the ratio of the estimates of property crime to violent crime was higher for the elderly (13 to 1) than for younger persons ages 25 to 49 (3 to 1) and persons ages 50 to 64 (5 to 1); 3) elderly homicide rates declined 44%, from 3.7 homicides per 100,000 persons in 1993 to 2.1 per 100,000 in 2011; 4) more than half (56 percent) of elderly violent crime victims reported the victimization to police, compared to more than a third (38 percent) for persons ages 12 to 24; and 5) among elderly violent crime victims, about 59% reported being victimized at or near their home.
Main Term(s): Crimes against the elderly
Index Term(s): BJS Resources; Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS); Elder Abuse; Elderly (65+); Elderly victims; Institutional elder abuse; Victimization; Victims of Crime
Note: Part of the Crimes against Persons Age 65 or Older Series. The U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) is the principal Federal agency responsible for measuring crime, criminal victimization, criminal offenders, victims of crime, correlates of crime, and the operation of criminal and civil justice systems at the federal, state, tribal, and local levels. BJS collects, analyzes, and disseminates reliable and valid statistics on crime and justice systems in the United States, supports improvements to state and local criminal justice information systems, and participates with national and international organizations to develop and recommend national standards for justice statistics.
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=270441

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