skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 249216 Find in a Library
Title: Police Use of Nonfatal Force, 2002-2011
Series: BJS Special Reports
Author(s): Shelley Hyland; Lynn Langton; Elizabeth Davis
Corporate Author: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Date Published: November 2015
Page Count: 17
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
810 Seventh Street NW
Washington, DC 20531
United States of America
Document: Agency Summary|PDF (Summary)|PDF (Full Report)|Text
Agency Summary: http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5456 
Type: Report (Annual/Periodic) ; Report (Study/Research); Statistics; Survey
Format: Document; Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Using data from the 2002, 2005, 2008, and 2011 Police-Public Contact Survey (PPCS) supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), this study examined the prevalence, circumstance, and characteristics of incidents of the police threat of or use of non-fatal force with survey respondents in their most recent contact with police and whether it varied across race and Hispanic origin.
Abstract: From 2002 to 2011, an annual average of 44 million persons age 16 or older had one or more face-to-face contacts with police. Of those who had contact with police, 1.6 percent experienced the threat or use of non-fatal force by the police during their most recent contact. Approximately 75 percent of those who experienced non-fatal force from police perceived it as excessive. Of those who experienced the use of non-fatal force by police, a greater percentage of non-Hispanic Blacks (2.8 percent) than non-Hispanic Whites (1.0 percent) and Hispanics (1.4 percent) perceived the force as excessive. Blacks (3.5 percent) were more likely than Whites (1.4 percent) and Hispanics (2.1 percent) to experience police non-fatal use of force. A greater percentage of persons who experienced the use of police non-fatal force (44 percent) had two or more contacts with police compared with those who did not experience such force (28 percent). Blacks (14 percent) were more likely than Hispanics (5.9 percent) and slightly more likely than Whites (6.9 percent) to experience non-fatal force during police street stops. Traffic stops that involved an officer and driver of different races were more likely to involve non-fatal force (2.0 percent) than traffic stops that involved an officer and driver of the same race (0.8 percent). Blacks (1.4 percent) were twice as likely as Whites (0.7 percent) to experience force during contacts that involved a personal search. 22 tables
Main Term(s): Police-citizen interactions
Index Term(s): Comparative analysis; Police-minority relations; Public Opinion of the Police; Race; Stop and frisk; Use of Force; Vehicle stops
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=271357

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.