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NCJ Number: 249822 Find in a Library
Title: Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men
Journal: NIJ Journal  Issue:277
Series: NIJ Journal
Author(s): Andre B. Rosay
Date Published: September 2016
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2012-PJ-BX-K001
Document: HTML|PDF
Type: Program/Project Description; Report (Grant Sponsored); Report (Study/Research); Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article reports on a study of violence against Native American and Alaska Native women and men that examined the prevalence of psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence among this population, as well as the perpetrator’s race and the impact of the violence.
Abstract: Study findings indicate high rates of violence against both women and men who are Native American or Alaska Native. Just over four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women (84.3 percent) had experienced violence in their lifetimes. This included 56.1 percent who had experienced physical violence by an intimate partner. 48.8 percent who had experienced stalking, and 66.4 percent who had experienced psychological aggression by an intimate partner. The study also found that 39.8 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women had experienced violence in the past year. This included 14.4 percent who had experienced sexual violence, 8.6 percent who had experienced physical violence by an intimate partner, 11.6 percent who had experienced stalking, and 25.5 percent who had experienced psychological aggression by an intimate partner. American Indian and Alaska Native men also had high victimization rates; 81.6 percent had experienced violence in their lifetimes, including 27.5 percent who had experienced sexual violence, The majority of American Indian and Alaska Native victims have experienced violence at the hands of at least one interracial perpetrator in their lifetimes (97 percent of female victims and 90 percent of male victims). The American Indian and Alaska Native population is relatively small, so these results are not surprising. This provides continuing support for federally recognized tribes’ sovereign right to prosecute non-Indian offenders. Data are shown for the following victimization impacts: fear for safety, physical injury, services to provide relief, and missed days of work or school. 1 exhibit and 7 notes
Main Term(s): Victims of violent crime
Index Term(s): Alaska Natives; American Indians; Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence; Female victims; Indian justice; Male female victim comparisons; NIJ grant-related documents; NIJ Resources; Offender physical characteristics; psychological abuse; Psychological victimization effects; Race; Sexual assault; Stalking; Victimization; Violent crime statistics
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=271971

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