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NCJ Number: NCJ 142784     Find in a Library
Title: Effects of Partial Drug Testing on Drug-Use Behavior and Self-Disclosure Validity
Corporate Author: Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority
United States of America
Date Published: 02/1993
Page Count: 81
Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
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Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority
300 West Adams Street
Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60606
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: To analyze drug use behavior and self-disclosure validity in a group of high-risk probationers, a sample of participants in the St. Clair (Illinois) Intensive Drug Abuser Program provided urine samples, all of which were tested for drugs. The same procedure was followed for members of a control group. The IDAP emphasizes close supervision, frequent drug testing, and a drug-free lifestyle.
Abstract: Members of the experimental group were told that their specimens had a one-in-three chance of being tested; all subjects received their test results. The results showed that testing a one-third random sample of collected specimens did not lead to increased drug use or to a reduction in self-disclosure validity over a one-month period. These effects were not changed when other potential influences were examined, including race, age, probation officer, or offense. The findings called into question the conventional assumption that testing and feedback deter drug use. The study suggests that it may be possible to redesign drug-testing programs to decrease cost while maintaining effectiveness.
Main Term(s): Probationer substance abuse
Index Term(s): Urinalysis ; Sampling ; Self evaluation ; Deterrence effectiveness ; Illinois
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=142784

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