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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 240532     Find in a Library
  Title: Multiple Jeopardy: Poor, Economically Disconnected, and Child Welfare Involved
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Maureen O. Marcenko ; Jennifer L. Hook ; Jennifer L. Romich ; JoAnn S. Lee
  Journal: Child Maltreatment  Volume:17  Issue:3  Dated:August 2012  Pages:195 to 206
  Date Published: 08/2012
  Page Count: 12
  Annotation: This study took advantage of a statewide survey of child welfare–involved parents to examine economic disconnection in this population and to explore the relationship between disconnection and parent engagement in child welfare.
  Abstract: Although the welfare literature reveals a growing number of parents who are economically disconnected, meaning neither employed nor receiving cash assistance, little is known about the prevalence and impacts of disconnection among child welfare–involved parents. This study took advantage of a statewide survey of child welfare–involved parents to examine economic disconnection in this population and to explore the relationship between disconnection and parent engagement in child welfare. One fifth of the sample reported that they were economically disconnected, with several patterns differentiating disconnected caregivers from those who received benefits or earned income through employment. Disconnected caregivers were younger and more frequently had children in out-of-home placements as opposed to receiving services in home than economically connected caregivers. They also reported higher unmet needs for basic services, such as housing and medical care, but were more likely to report financial help from their informal network. Finally, disconnected caregivers reported lower engagement in child welfare services even when controlling for demographic characteristics, chronic psychosocial risk factors, placement status, and maltreatment type. The findings document economic disconnection among child welfare–involved parents and raise important questions about the implications of disconnection for families and for child welfare outcomes. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
  Main Term(s): Child welfare
  Index Term(s): Economic influences ; Policy ; Economic analysis ; Child abuse investigations ; Assessment (child health and welfare)
  Sponsoring Agency: US Dept of Health and Human Services
Admin for Children and Families
United States of America
  Type: Report (Study/Research)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=262612

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