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NCJ Number: NCJ 240534     Find in a Library
Title: Effects of a Multidisciplinary Family Treatment Drug Court on Child and Family Outcomes: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study
Journal: Child Maltreatment  Volume:17  Issue:3  Dated:August 2012  Pages:218 to 230
Author(s): Eric J. Burns ; Michael D. Pullmann ; Ericka S. Weathers ; Mark L. Wirschem ; Jill K. Murphy
Date Published: 08/2012
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: King Cty Superior Court
United States of America
Grant Number: D40041
Document: HTML 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This quasi-experimental study replicates previous research on FTDCs by comparing parental substance abuse treatment and child welfare outcomes for 76 FTDC participants to outcomes for 76 parents in the same system who did not participate in the FTDC, using propensity score matching.
Abstract: Family treatment drug courts (FTDCs) are an increasingly common approach for serving families involved in child welfare due to parental substance abuse; however, the evidence base for FTDCs remains emergent. This quasi-experimental study replicates previous research on FTDCs by comparing parental substance abuse treatment and child welfare outcomes for 76 FTDC participants to outcomes for 76 parents in the same system who did not participate in the FTDC, using propensity score matching. Data were obtained from the Superior court, FTDC, child welfare, and public substance use treatment service administrative databases. The follow-up window for participants ranged from 1 to 3 years. Results showed FTDC parents had significantly more review and motion hearings, were significantly more likely to enter treatment, entered treatment faster, received more treatment, and were more likely to successfully complete treatment. FTDC children spent significantly less time placed out of home, ended child welfare system involvement sooner, were more likely to be permanently placed and discharged from child welfare, and were more likely to return to parental care. Results demonstrate that FTDCs promote positive treatment and child welfare outcomes without deepening participants’ involvement in justice systems. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
Main Term(s): Child welfare
Index Term(s): Drug abuse ; Abusing parents ; Alcohol abuse ; Children of alcoholics ; Children of drug abusers ; Drug Courts
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=262614

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