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The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection.
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NCJ Number: NCJ 240825     Find in a Library
Title: Validation of Tool Mark Analysis of Cut Costal Cartilage
  Document URL: HTML 
  Dataset URL: DATASET 1
Author(s): Jennifer C. Love Ph.D. ; Sharon M. Derrick Ph.D. ; Jason M. Wiersema Ph.D. ; Charles Peters Ph.D.
  Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:2  Dated:March 2012  Pages:306 to 311
Date Published: 03/2012
Page Count: 6
  Annotation: This study was designed to establish the potential error rate associated with the generally accepted method of tool mark analysis of cut marks in costal cartilage.
Abstract: This study was designed to establish the potential error rate associated with the generally accepted method of tool mark analysis of cut marks in costal cartilage. Three knives with different blade types were used to make experimental cut marks in costal cartilage of pigs. Each cut surface was cast, and each cast was examined by three analysts working independently. The presence of striations, regularity of striations, and presence of a primary and secondary striation pattern were recorded for each cast. The distance between each striation was measured. The results showed that striations were not consistently impressed on the cut surface by the blade’s cutting edge. Also, blade type classification by the presence or absence of striations led to a 65 percent misclassification rate. Use of the classification tree and cross-validation methods and inclusion of the mean interstriation distance decreased the error rate to c. 50 percent. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensic anthropology
Index Term(s): Toolmark identification ; Research methods ; Tissue analysis ; NIJ grant-related documents
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2008-NI-CX-0004
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Country: United States of America
Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=262906

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