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NCJ Number: NCJ 240858     Find in a Library
Title: Test for Carrion Fly Full Siblings: A Tool for Detecting Postmortem Relocation of a Corpse
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:2  Dated:March 2012  Pages:535 to 538
Author(s): Christine J. Picard, Ph.D. ; Jeffrey D. Wells, Ph.D.
Date Published: 03/2012
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: Smithsonian Institution
United States of America

West Virginia University Forensic Science Initiative
United States of America

National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2001-RC-CX-K003
Document: HTML 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The authors of this study proposed a genetic test for full sibship for a pair of carrion flies that could reveal the postmortem relocation of a corpse.
Abstract: The authors propose a genetic test for full sibship for a pair of carrion flies that could reveal the postmortem relocation of a corpse. A carrion fly larva is sometimes left behind when a corpse is moved. The discovery of full sibling larvae of approximately the same developmental stage at two locations would strongly suggest that a corpse was moved between those two sites. Distributions of pairwise comparisons of relatedness (R) coefficients were generated using amplified fragment length polymorphism profiles for nine samples of laboratory-generated full siblings as well as for a reference sample of nonfull sibling Phormia regina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The mean relative R coefficient, a pairwise measure of the proportion of shared alleles, was 0.479 (±0.289 SD) for full siblings, close to the theoretical expectation of 0.5. A likelihood ratio (LR) test was based on observed distributions of R. R greater than 0.55 corresponded to an LR greater than 1000 favoring full sibship for that pair of individuals. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Autopsy ; Time of death determination ; Death investigations ; NIJ grant-related documents
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=262939

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