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The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection.
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NCJ Number: NCJ 240900     Find in a Library
Title: It Is Not Always Black and White: An Examination of Black and Latino Intergroup Violence
  Document URL: PDF 
Author(s): Lyndsay N. Boggess
  Journal: Criminal Justice Review  Volume:37  Issue:3  Dated:September 2012  Pages:319 to 336
Date Published: 09/2012
Page Count: 18
  Annotation: This study investigated the consequences of Black to Latino transition in a disadvantaged area of Los Angeles and, importantly, to examine the impact of racial change on intragroup and intergroup youth violence.
Abstract: Criminological research has consistently found evidence that residential instability leads to increases in violent crime, but little research assesses whether a specific type of residential turnover—racial and ethnic succession—impacts who is involved in the violent crime event. The purpose of this study is to investigate the consequences of Black to Latino transition in a disadvantaged area of Los Angeles and, importantly, to examine the impact of racial change on intragroup and intergroup youth violence. The author utilizes structural equation modeling to estimate a series of four simultaneous equations testing the rates of Black on Black, Black on Latino, Latino on Latino, and Latino on Black-aggravated assaults and robberies between 2000 and 2006. Since many theories of intergroup violence cite the economic differential between groups as a motivating factor, the author incorporates the ratio of Black to Latino median household income as a predicative factor. The author finds some evidence that racial/ethnic change leads to increased violence, but only for within-group robberies, and that racial/ethnic change is not a significant predictor of intergroup violence. Contrary to theoretical expectation, income inequality is not a significant predictor of changes in intergroup violence. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans ; Intra-racial crime ; Cross cultural comparisons ; Racially motivated violence ; California ; Hispanic
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Country: United States of America
Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=262981

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