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NCJ Number: NCJ 241147     Find in a Library
Title: Manipulation and Force as Sexual Coercion Tactics: Conceptual and Empirical Differences
Journal: Aggressive Behavior  Volume:33  Issue:4  Dated:2007  Pages:291 to 303
Author(s): Amy E. Lyndon ; Jacquelyn W. White ; Kelly M. Kadlec
Date Published: 2007
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America

National Institute of Mental Health
United States of America

Ctr's for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
United States of America
Grant Number: 98-WT-VX-0010;R01MH45083
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the relationship between perpetrator characteristics, situational characteristics, and type of sexual coercion tactics used to obtain sexual contact (including sexual intercourse) with an unwilling partner.
Abstract: This study examines the relationship between perpetrator characteristics, situational characteristics, and type of sexual coercion tactics used to obtain sexual contact (including sexual intercourse) with an unwilling partner. Men who used manipulation or force were compared to each other and to men who engaged in only consensual sex. Participants were college men drawn from the first wave of a 5-year longitudinal study. Stepwise discriminant function analyses, univariate analyses of variance (ANOVA), and v2 analyses tested group differences. As predicted, men who used force reported more childhood sexual abuse, witnessed more domestic violence, were more accepting of male violence, and were less likely to endorse love as a motive for sex than men in both the manipulation and consent groups. Men in the force group were also more likely to have had a casual relationship with the woman, and to be drinking and also intoxicated during the coercive incident than men in the manipulation group. Hypothesized differences between men who used force and manipulation regarding parental physical punishment, traditional gender role attitudes, delinquency, hedonistic and dominance motives for sex, prior sexual contact, and the length of the relationship were not supported. The results suggest that types of tactic used in sexual assaults can be distinguished on the basis of person and situational variables and that knowledge of these differences can facilitate future research, as well as rape deterrent and intervention programs. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Criminal methods ; Sexual assault ; Comparative analysis ; Sex offender profiles ; Violence causes ; Child abuse as crime factor ; NIJ grant-related documents
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263235

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