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NCJ Number: NCJ 241162     Find in a Library
Title: “Learning the Good With the Bad”: Are Occupational White-Collar Offenders Taught How to Neutralize Their Crimes?
Journal: Criminal Justice Review  Volume:37  Issue:4  Dated:December 2012  Pages:461 to 477
Author(s): Paul M. Klenowski
Date Published: 12/2012
Page Count: 17
Document: HTML 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The aim of this project was to understand the learning process behind occupational offenses, more specifically, do those we associate with provide neutralizations that may allow us to commit an occupational crime?
Abstract: Occupational white-collar offenders are individuals who commit their offenses while in a position of trust and fiduciary responsibility within the respective company. Much has been written about their motivations and actual offenses; however, minimal empirical progress has been made determining whether the presence of an actual learning process exists that may inspire, encourage, or entice an individual to commit such crimes. Moreover, the research narrows further when attempting to determine whether a set of linguistic phrases that allows individuals to justify their crimes prior to commission may also be learned. Thus, the aim of this project was to understand the learning process behind occupational offenses, more specifically, do those we associate with provide neutralizations that may allow us to commit an occupational crime? To answer this question, 40 federally incarcerated occupational white-collar offenders were queried using semistructured one-on-one interviews. The results indicate that there is some empirical support for the notion that neutralizing language may in fact be learned from certain groups that we interact with both on and off the job. These findings suggest that further empirical investigation is warranted. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): White collar crime ; Motivation ; Neutralization theory ; White collar offenders ; White collar crime causes
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263252

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