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NCJRS Abstract

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  NCJ Number: NCJ 241209     Find in a Library
  Title: Morphoscopic Trait Expressions Used to Identify Southwest Hispanics
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Carolyn V. Hurst, M.A.
  Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:4  Dated:July 2012  Pages:859 to 865
  Date Published: 07/2012
  Page Count: 7
  Annotation: This research focuses on the 8 cranial morphoscopic traits of Southwest Hispanics from Birkby et al. (J Forensic Sci 2008;53(1):29–33) and 18 additional traits.
  Abstract: Hispanics represent the largest and fastest growing minority in the United States. It is increasingly important to understand the skeletal morphology and regional variation within this diverse group. This research focuses on the 8 cranial morphoscopic traits of Southwest Hispanics from Birkby et al. (J Forensic Sci 2008;53(1):29–33) and 18 additional traits. Frequency distributions assessed the prevalence of trait expressions in Southwest Hispanic, African-American, and European-American samples. Forward stepwise discriminant function analysis indicated the best traits for differentiating these three groups. Six of the Birkby et al.’s traits are prevalent in the Southwest Hispanic sample and the best traits to distinguish the three groups are as follows: incisor shoveling, anterior malar projection, nasal sill, oval window visualization, enamel extensions, anterior nasal spine, nasal aperture width, and alveolar prognathism. This research demonstrates the efficacy of morphoscopic traits in ancestry determinations and the utility of the aforementioned traits in discriminating Southwest Hispanics, African Americans, and European Americans. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
  Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
  Index Term(s): Bone analysis ; Family histories ; Forensic anthropology ; Parentage determination ; Hispanic
  Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263299

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