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NCJ Number: NCJ 241220     Find in a Library
Title: Stress-Related Temporary Hearing Loss—Evaluation of Bio-Humoral Parameters: Forensic and Criminological Applications
  Document URL: HTML 
Author(s): Vito Borraccia, M.D. ; Sara Sblano, M.D., Ph.D. ; Felice Carabellese, M.D. ; Rosalisa De Sario, M.D. ; Roberto Zefferino, M.D. ; Francesco Vinci, M.D.
  Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:4  Dated:July 2012  Pages:946 to 951
Date Published: 07/2012
Page Count: 6
  Annotation: This study evaluated the perception of acoustic stimuli administered in stressful conditions in 14 phobic patients and in 20 healthy subjects, in order to assess the influence of stress on perceiving capabilities.
Abstract: The body-alarm reaction results from the activation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which can lead to physio-psychological phenomena such as an exclusion/occlusion of the sense of hearing. One hypothesis to explain this alteration consists in a hydromechanical dysfunction of the internal ear attributable to antidiuretic hormone. In this study, the authors evaluated the perception of acoustic stimuli administered in stressful conditions in 14 phobic patients and in 20 healthy subjects, in order to assess the influence of stress on perceiving capabilities. The authors also measured the concentration of salivary cortisol and IL-1B and neurovegetative parameters to objectivize and quantify the physiological reactions. The results show a worse perception of the frequencies of the human voice under stress; these findings could have a dual value: in the legal field, concerning criminal liability, and on the operative context, regarding the efficiency of verbal communication among law enforcement officers in situations inducing intense emotional stress. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Police occupational stress ; Stress assessment ; Forensic pathology ; Reactions to crime
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Country: United States of America
Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263310

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