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NCJ Number: NCJ 241222     Find in a Library
Title: Accuracy and Reliability of Cone Beam Computed Tomography of the Jaws for Comparative Forensic Identification: A Preliminary Study
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:4  Dated:July 2012  Pages:964 to 968
Author(s): Michael Murphy, B.Sc., B.D.S., F.D.S.R.C.S., M.Sc. ; Nicholas Drage, B.D.S., F.D.S.R.C.S. ; Romina Carabott, B.Ch.D., M.Sc. ; Catherine Adams, D.C.R.R., B.D.S., M.Sc.
Date Published: 07/2012
Page Count: 5
Document: HTML 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In this study, the accuracy and reliability of recording forensic information from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of the jaws when compared to conventional panoramic radiographs has been analyzed under experimental conditions.
Abstract: Conventional computed tomography is an emerging modality in forensic identification but is not sufficiently accurate for use in dental identification primarily because of problems with metallic dental restoration–induced streak artifact. In this study, the accuracy and reliability of recording forensic information from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of the jaws when compared to conventional panoramic radiographs has been analyzed under experimental conditions. Information could be recorded with near-perfect repeatability and reproducibility. Information could also be recorded accurately, the sensitivity being 96.6 percent (95 percent CI, 95.1–98.1) and specificity being 98.4 percent (95 percent CI, 96.2–100). The metal dental restoration–induced streak artifact was at a level that permitted, in most cases, accurate observations. This is considered an important step in validating CBCT as a tool in comparative dental identification of bodies. It may have a role in mass fatalities and in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents, but further studies are required to assess the feasibility of this. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Disaster procedures ; Dental analysis ; X-Ray Technology ; Victims of terrorism ; Victims of violence ; United Kingdom
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263312

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