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NCJ Number: NCJ 241238     Find in a Library
Title: Determination of an Effective Housekeeping Gene for the Quantification of mRNA for Forensic Applications
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:4  Dated:July 2012  Pages:1051 to 1058
Author(s): Lilliana I. Moreno, M.A., M.FS. ; Courtney M. Tate, Ph.D. ; Erika L. Knott, B.S. ; Jade E. McDaniel, B.S. ; Stephanie S. Rogers, B.S. ; Barbara W. Koons, M.S. ; Mark F. Kavlick, B.S. ; Rhonda L. Craig, M.S. ; James M. Robertson, Ph.D.
Date Published: 07/2012
Page Count: 8
Document: HTML 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article discusses the potential application of mRNA for the identification of biological fluids using molecular techniques has been a recent development in forensic serology.
Abstract: The potential application of mRNA for the identification of biological fluids using molecular techniques has been a recent development in forensic serology. Constitutively expressed housekeeping genes can assess the amount of mRNA recovered from a sample, establish its suitability for downstream applications, and provide a reference point to corroborate the identity of the fluid. qPCR was utilized to compare the expression levels of housekeeping genes from forensic-like body fluid stains to establish the most appropriate assessment of human mRNA quantity prior to profiling. Although variability was observed between fluids and individuals, results indicated that beta-2 microglobulin exhibited the highest expression for all body fluids examined and across donors. A one-way analysis of variance was performed for housekeeping gene variability between donors (at the ax, 0.05, significance level), and the results indicated significant differences for semen, vaginal secretions, and menstrual blood. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Biological influences ; Blood/body fluid analysis ; Scientific techniques ; DNA fingerprinting
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263328

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