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NCJ Number: NCJ 241250     Find in a Library
Title: Fatal Paradoxical Air Embolism Diagnosed by Postmortem Imaging and Autopsy
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:4  Dated:July 2012  Pages:1118 to 1123
Author(s): Masaki Fujioka, M.D., Ph.D. ; Daisuke Niino, M.D. ; Masahiro Ito, M.D., Ph.D. ; Yohjiro Matsuoka, M.D., Ph.D.
Date Published: 07/2012
Page Count: 6
Document: HTML 
Type: Case Study
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study reported a case of sudden death caused by paradoxical air embolism of coronary and cerebral arteries, diagnosed by the pre autopsy computed tomography (CT) scanning.
Abstract: The recognition and visualization of an arterial gas embolism are difficult. The authors report a case of sudden death caused by paradoxical air embolism of coronary and cerebral arteries, diagnosed by the pre autopsy computed tomography (CT) scanning. A 54-year-old woman suddenly died after the self-removal of the jugular vein catheter. Postmortem imaging examination using CT scanning showed multiple gas embolisms in the cerebral arteries, pulmonary artery, right atrium and ventricle, left ventricle, aorta, and coronary arteries. These findings suggested that the occurrence of acute ischemia of the brain and heart caused by massive air inflow to the artery. Conventional autopsy revealed a patent foramen ovale of the heart. These results indicated that the patient died of paradoxical air embolization of the coronary and cerebral arteries through a patent foramen ovale because of right-to-left shunting. The use of postmortem imaging as an aid for conventional autopsy has proved to be of advantage in the case of gas embolism. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Autopsy ; Medical research ; Death investigations ; Japan
   
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https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263340

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