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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 241257     Find in a Library
  Title: (In)security-at-a-Distance: Rescaling Justice, Risk and Warfare in a Transnational Age
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Katja Franko Aas
  Journal: Global Crime  Volume:13  Issue:4  Dated:November 2012  Pages:235 to 253
  Date Published: 11/2012
  Page Count: 19
  Annotation: The article examines the progressive de-bounding of social risks and the blurring boundaries between internal and external notions of security.
  Abstract: The article examines the progressive de-bounding of social risks and the blurring boundaries between internal and external notions of security. Contemporary forms of cross-border connectivity bring to our attention the renewed importance of analyzing distance (physical, social and other) in criminology. Globalizing processes significantly expand the scale and scope of social interaction, including violent conflict and crime control and security strategies, by offering social agents a possibility of acting from the point of ‘strategic globality’. The article outlines an emerging landscape of ‘security at a distance’, where previously local and national phenomena are transformed by new forms of transnational connectivity, risk and movement. It suggests that, through the emerging forms of globalism, criminal justice is plugging into trans-border circuits of circulation of people, forms of knowledge and social and political action, where, ultimately, crime control can become an export and war can be, metaphorically, seen as an import. Abstract published by arrangement with Taylor and Francis.
  Main Term(s): Criminology
  Index Term(s): Security ; Geographic distribution of crime ; International law of war ; Crime in foreign countries
  Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263347

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