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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 241290     Find in a Library
  Title: Youth Violence Crime or Self-Help? Marginalized Urban Males' Perspectives on the Limited Efficacy of the Criminal Justice System to Stop Youth Violence
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Deanna L. Wilkinson ; Chauncey C. Beaty ; Regina M. Lurry
  Journal: ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science  Volume:623  Issue:1  Dated:May 2009  Pages:25 to 38
  Date Published: 05/2009
  Page Count: 14
  Annotation: This article uses Black’s theory as a framework to assess the role of violence among African-American male youth in disadvantaged urban communities in New York City.
  Abstract: In 1983, sociologist Donald Black proposed the theory of “Crime as Social Control,” in which he argued that for the socially disadvantaged, crime is commonly moralistic and can be characterized as self-help in the pursuit of justice when legal protection fails. This article uses Black’s theory as a framework to assess the role of violence among African-American male youth in disadvantaged urban communities in New York City. Using in-depth interview data for 416 young violent male offenders, the authors analyze youths’ perspectives on their personal safety; access to legal, governmental, and communal protection from violence; the effectiveness of the criminal justice system and police in addressing crime and violence in their neighborhoods; and the need to rely on self- and group/gang-protection as a means of social control. The implications for self-help theory are discussed. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
  Main Term(s): Young juvenile offenders
  Index Term(s): Violence ; Black/African Americans ; Theory ; Social control ; NIJ grant-related documents
  Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
  Grant Number: XIJ-2006-0-04
  Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263380

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