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NCJ Number: NCJ 241334     Find in a Library
Title: Differential Attrition Rates and Active Parental Consent
Journal: Evaluation Review  Volume:23  Issue:3  Dated:June 1999  Pages:316 to 335
Author(s): Finn-Aage Esbensen ; Michelle Hughes Miller ; Terrance J. Taylor ; Ni He ; Adrienne Freng
Date Published: 06/1999
Page Count: 20
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 94-IJ-CX-0058
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article uses the pretest data for a student survey to examine demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral differences between those students for whom active parental consent was provided and those for whom active parental consent was either denied or for whom no response was received.
Abstract: Active parental consent in survey research poses ethical and practical concerns. One common argument against the requirement of active consent procedures is its effect on participation rates. There is additional concern that higher risk groups may be underrepresented in the final sample. Empirical support of differential attrition, however, is lacking. In the current multisite longitudinal study, passive consent procedures were approved for the collection of pretest data. For subsequent years of data collection, active parental consent procedures were required. In this article, the authors use the pretest data to examine demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral differences between those students for whom active consent was provided and those for whom active consent was either denied or for whom no response was received. The results indicate that active consent procedures produce deleterious effects on participation rates and lead to an underrepresentation of at-risk youth in the sample. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Juvenile delinquency research
Index Term(s): Surveys ; Research methods ; Comparative analysis ; Human research subject protection ; Parental influence ; NIJ grant-related documents
Note: Earlier versions of this article were presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the American Evaluation Association and the 1997 Annual Meeting of American Society of Criminology.
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263424

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