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NCJ Number: NCJ 241556     Find in a Library
Title: Alternatives to Detention for African American Adolescents with Substance Use and Co-occurring Disorders
Journal: Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly  Volume:30  Issue:3  Dated:July - September 2012  Pages:343 to 352
Author(s): Fred Dyer, Ph.D., CADC
Date Published: 07/2012
Page Count: 10
Document: HTML 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article examines disproportionate minority contact and alternatives to detention for African-American adolescents with substance use and co-occurring disorders.
Abstract: Juvenile justice services, disproportionate minority contact, and alternatives to detention for African-American adolescents with substance use and co-occurring disorders continue to be areas of concern for juvenile justice, substance abuse, and mental health administrators. Additionally, salient is the question regarding the purpose of the juvenile justice system. Whether its focus is “punishment or rehabilitation” affects outlook, services, approaches, and outcomes. This article examines disproportionate minority contact and alternatives to detention for African-American adolescents with substance use and co-occurring disorders along with evidence-based and community-based alternatives to detention. Abstract published by arrangement with Taylor and Francis.
Main Term(s): Juvenile detention
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans ; Alternatives to institutionalization ; Juvenile detention reform ; Juvenile drug abusers ; Underage Drinking ; Minority overrepresentation
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263646

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