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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 241682     Find in a Library
  Title: Exploring Racial Disparities in the Brief Jail Mental Health Screen
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Seth J. Prins ; Fred C. Osher ; Henry J. Steadman ; Pamela Clark Robbins ; Brian Case
  Journal: Criminal Justice and Behavior  Volume:39  Issue:5  Dated:May 2012  Pages:635 to 645
  Date Published: 05/2012
  Page Count: 11
  Annotation: The authors analyzed validation data from the Brief Jail Mental Health Screen (BJMHS) to determine whether race predicted screening results and if such a prediction was driven by particular screen items.
  Abstract: The authors analyzed validation data from the Brief Jail Mental Health Screen (BJMHS) to determine whether race predicted screening results and if such a prediction was driven by particular screen items. A total of 22,000 individuals entering five jails over two 8-month periods were screened. The authors constructed binary logistic regression models to assess the impact of race on screening positive and endorsing particular items. Blacks and Latinos had lower odds than Whites of screening positive. Blacks and Latinos had somewhat lower odds than Whites of endorsing two or more symptom items but had appreciably lower odds of endorsing items regarding prior mental health service utilization. Racial differences in BJMHS screening results likely reflect the reproduction of racial disparities rather than valid differences because results were driven by items reflecting known barriers in access to mental health services. Nonetheless, the instrument is likely to remain an improvement over typical jail screening procedures. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
  Main Term(s): Mentally ill offenders
  Index Term(s): Right to treatment ; Racial discrimination ; Offender mental health services ; NIJ grant-related documents ; Race
  Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
  Grant Number: 2005-IJ-CX-0004
  Type: Report (Study/Research)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263773

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