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NCJ Number: NCJ 241684     Find in a Library
Title: Behind the Veil of Juror Decision Making: Testing the Effects of Muslim Veils and Defendant Race in the Courtroom
Journal: Criminal Justice Behavior  Volume:39  Issue:5  Dated:May 2012  Pages:666 to 678
Author(s): Evelyn Maeder ; Julie Dempsey ; Joanna Pozzulo
Date Published: 05/2012
Page Count: 13
Document: HTML 
Type: Case Study
Language: English ; French
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This research sought to test the influence of a victim’s wearing of a veil while testifying on juror decisionmaking in a sexual assault trial.
Abstract: Recent case law has considered whether a Muslim woman who wishes to appear in court should be allowed to testify wearing a veil that covers part of her face (e.g., Muhammad v. Paruk, 2008, in the United States, R. v. N.S., 2009, in Canada). The current research sought to test the influence of a victim’s wearing of a veil while testifying on juror decisionmaking in a sexual assault trial. In addition, the study tested for effects of defendant race using Middle Eastern and Caucasian as the target races, given that there is a paucity of research comparing these races in the juror decisionmaking literature. Results demonstrated that contrary to hypotheses, jurors were more convinced of the defendant’s guilt when the victim was wearing a burqa or hijab to testify than when she testified wearing no veil. Defendant race did not have an effect on any of the dependent variables in this research; however, mock juror gender was found to be influential. Potential reasons for these findings and directions for future research are discussed. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
Main Term(s): Jury decisionmaking
Index Term(s): Defendants ; Trials ; Religious freedom ; Sexual assault ; Religion ; Race
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263775

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