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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 241705     Find in a Library
  Title: Analysis of Fatal Police Shootings: Time, Space, and Suicide by Police
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Dragana Kesic ; Stuart D. M. Thomas ; James R. P. Ogloff
  Journal: Criminal Justice and Behavior  Volume:39  Issue:8  Dated:August 2012  Pages:1107 to 1125
  Date Published: 08/2012
  Page Count: 19
  Annotation: This study analyzed factors characteristic of 45 coronial investigations of police engagements that culminated in civilian fatalities between 1980 and 2008 in Victoria, Australia.
  Abstract: Police use of lethal force occurs rarely and is legally permissible when used appropriately. When police use fatal force, their behavior is highly scrutinized by the legal system and the public. The present study analyzed factors characteristic of 45 coronial investigations of police engagements that culminated in civilian fatalities between 1980 and 2008 in Victoria, Australia. Findings suggest that fatalities commonly occurred at arrest during unplanned police operation, and the majority of incidents were of short duration. The majority of the decedents were armed, acted aggressively, resisted arrest, and escalated the incident. A third of the incidents met the criteria for possible suicide by police. Differences in mental health, incident, and police response characteristics were found between those who met these criteria and those who did not. The findings and their implications for law enforcement, the public, and the mental health system are presented and discussed. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
  Main Term(s): Police use of deadly force
  Index Term(s): Suicide ; Mental disorders ; Police policies and procedures ; Police-citizen interactions ; Australia
  Type: Report (Study/Research)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263796

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