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NCJ Number: NCJ 241734     Find in a Library
Title: Ethnic Identity and Offending Trajectories Among Mexican American Juvenile Offenders: Gang Membership and Psychosocial Maturity
Journal: Journal of Research on Adolescence  Volume:22  Issue:4  Dated:December 2012  Pages:782 to 796
Author(s): George P. Knight ; Sandra H. Losoya ; Young Il Cho ; Laurie Chassin ; Joanna Lee Williams ; Sonia Cota-Robles
Date Published: 12/2012
Page Count: 15
Sponsoring Agency: William Penn Foundation
United States of America

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
United States of America

National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America

Pennsylvania Cmssn on Crime and Delinquency
United States of America

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
United States of America

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
US Dept of Justice
United States of America

National Institute on Drug Abuse
United States of America

Ctr's for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
United States of America

Arizona Governor's Justice Cmssn
United States of America
Grant Number: 1999-IJ-CX-0053;2000-MU-MU-0007;R01 DA019697-01
Document: HTML 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the association of joint trajectories of ethnic identity and criminal offending to psychosocial maturity.
Abstract: The authors examined the association of joint trajectories of ethnic identity and criminal offending to psychosocial maturity, gang membership, and Mexican-American affiliation among 300 Mexican-American male juvenile offenders from ages 14 to 22. There were two low-offending groups: one was the highest in ethnic identity and changing slightly with age and the other was the lowest in ethnic identity and stable with age. A third group displayed moderately declining offending and moderately stable ethnic identity. A fourth group displayed high-offending individuals with moderate, but increasing, levels of ethnic identity, who were initially lower in psychosocial maturity and more likely to be gang members. The findings highlight the need to contextualize theories of ethnic identity development. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Juvenile/Youth Gangs
Index Term(s): Mexican Americans ; Self concept ; Age group comparisons ; Juvenile gang behavior patterns ; Juvenile offenders ; NIJ grant-related documents ; OJJDP grant-related documents ; Ethnicity
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=263825

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