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NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 242040     Find in a Library
  Title: Detection of Latent Bloodstains Beneath Painted Surfaces Using Reflected Infrared Photography
  Document URL: HTML 
  Author(s): Andrew Farrar, B.Sc. ; Glenn Porter, M.App.Sc. ; Adrian Renshaw, Ph.D.
  Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:5  Dated:September 2012  Pages:1190 to 1198
  Date Published: 09/2012
  Page Count: 9
  Annotation: This article discusses bloodstain evidence.
  Abstract: Bloodstain evidence is a highly valued form of physical evidence commonly found at scenes involving violent crimes. However, painting over bloodstains will often conceal this type of evidence. There is limited research in the scientific literature that describes methods of detecting painted-over bloodstains. This project employed a modified digital single-lens reflex camera to investigate the effectiveness of infrared (IR) photography in detecting latent bloodstain evidence beneath a layer or multiple layers of paint. A qualitative evaluation was completed by comparing images taken of a series of samples using both IR and standard (visible light) photography. Further quantitative image analysis was used to verify the findings. Results from this project indicate that bloodstain evidence can be detected beneath up to six layers of paint using reflected IR; however, the results vary depending on the characteristics of the paint. This technique provides crime scene specialists with a new field method to assist in locating, visualizing, and documenting painted-over bloodstain evidence. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
  Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
  Index Term(s): Violent crimes ; Scientific techniques ; Blood stains ; Photography techniques
  Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=264202

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