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NCJ Number: NCJ 242076     Find in a Library
Title: Dextromethorphan Abuse Leading to Assault, Suicide, or Homicide
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:57  Issue:5  Dated:September 2012  Pages:1388 to 1394
Author(s): Barry K. Logan, Ph.D. ; Jullian K. Yeakel, M.S.F.S. ; Gary Goldfogel, M.D. ; Michael P. Frost, M.D. ; Greg Sandstrom, A.A. ; Dennis J. Wickham, M.D.
Date Published: 09/2012
Page Count: 7
Document: HTML 
Type: Case Study
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Dextromethorphan is a commonly encountered antitussive medication which has found additional therapeutic use in the treatment of pseudobulbar disorder and as an adjunct to opiate use in pain management.
Abstract: Dextromethorphan is a commonly encountered antitussive medication which has found additional therapeutic use in the treatment of pseudobulbar disorder and as an adjunct to opiate use in pain management. Dextromethorphan at high doses has phencyclidine-like effects on the NMDA receptor system; recreational use of high doses has been found to cause mania and hallucinations. The toxicology and pharmacology of the drug in abuse are reviewed, and the historical literature of adverse psychiatric outcomes is assessed. Five new cases of dextromethorphan intoxication that resulted in assault, suicide, and homicide are reported, together with the corresponding toxicology results. Blood concentrations ranged from 300 to 19,000 ìg/L. These results are compared with typical concentrations reported in therapeutic use and impaired driving cases. Based on these findings, dextromethorphan should be considered as a potential causative agent in subjects presenting with mania, psychosis, or hallucinations, and abusers are at risk for violent and self-destructive acts. Abstract published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
Main Term(s): Forensics/Forensic Sciences
Index Term(s): Suicide ; Drug overdose ; Drug related fatalities
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=264238

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