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NCJ Number: NCJ 242587     Find in a Library
Title: Police Science: A Programmatic Analysis of How Police Science Stands in the German-Speaking World
Journal: .Siak - International Edition: Journal for Police Science and Practice  Volume:3  Dated:2013  Pages:4 to 18
Author(s): Joachim Kersten
Date Published: 2013
Page Count: 15
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: Austria
Annotation: Police science in the German-speaking world is a young discipline and typically has a "hybrid" status, rather than a homogenous research structure.
Abstract: Police science in the German-speaking world is a young discipline and typically has a "hybrid" status, rather than a homogenous research structure. The author returns to this metaphor at the end of the paper in the context of the current debate on "Tides and currents in police theories" (Journal of Police Studies 2012). "Polizeiwissenschaft" (police science) in the German-speaking world differs fundamentally from Anglo-American police science (otherwise known as police studies) for reasons related both to contemporary history and culture. This paper outlines both these reasons and the findings of international police science research with reference to a number of key studies, since greater attention should also be paid to these in police science in the German-speaking world. This paper concludes with a discussion on the topic of politics and violence. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Foreign police
Index Term(s): Comparative analysis ; Political influences ; Police policies and procedures ; Police research ; Germany ; Austria ; United States of America
   
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