skip navigation

CrimeSolutions.gov

Add your conference to our Justice Events calendar

PUBLICATIONS

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection.
To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database.

How to Obtain Documents
 
NCJ Number: NCJ 242594     Find in a Library
Title: Protection of Endangered Species: The Interplay Between Aesthetics, Law, Economics and Evolution
Journal: .Siak - International Edition: Journal for Police Science and Practice  Volume:3  Dated:2013  Pages:84 to 93
Author(s): Andreas R. Hassl
Date Published: 2013
Page Count: 10
Type: Legislation/Policy Description ; Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: Austria
Annotation: In 1982 Austria joined the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The aim of the signatory states, which presently number 175, is to protect endangered animal and plant species by restricting transnational trade in them.
Abstract: In 1982 Austria joined the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The aim of the signatory states, which presently number 175, is to protect endangered animal and plant species by restricting transnational trade in them. A complex body of regulations based on CITES has been established through several legislative acts of the European Union and national legislatures that hinder the transport of certain higher organisms, parts of them, and products produced from them through bureaucratization. The actual goal of CITES, that of reducing the removal of wild specimens from their natural habitats, is unfortunately barely discernible any more. Implementation of the increasing body of regulations causes considerable frustration, both among citizens affected by the norms, who are mostly not legal experts, and the responsible public security bodies, which tend to have little familiarity with natural history. This essay seeks to point out the points of friction between terms that are used both in the legal and biological fields but are not consistent in content, to shed light on the meaning of biological terms, and to present the biological processes that are intended to be influenced by CITES. An appraisal of the prospect of succeeding in protecting plant and animal species by counteracting natural selection through trade-restricting legislation runs through the essay. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): International agreements ; International cooperation ; Wildlife law enforcement ; Foreign laws ; Wildlife poaching ; Europe ; European Union
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=264669

* A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's web site is provided.