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NCJRS Abstract

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  NCJ Number: NCJ 242683     Find in a Library
  Title: Inhalant Initiation and the Relationship of Inhalant Use to the Use of Other Substances
  Author(s): Stephen R. Shamblen ; Ted Miller
  Journal: Journal of Drug Education  Volume:42  Issue:3  Dated:2012  Pages:327 to 346
  Date Published: 2012
  Page Count: 20
  Annotation: The current study examined the sequencing of substances relative to inhalants and the post-initiation correlates of inhalant use between youth and young adulthood in nationally representative Add Health data. Analyses examined the relationship of substance of initiation to use of other substances, as well as an examination of the relationship between substance use and consequences.
  Abstract: Conventional wisdom suggests that inhalant use is primarily isolated to youthful experimentation; however, a growing body of evidence suggests that inhalant use (a) occurs after use of common substances of experimentation (e.g., alcohol, marijuana), (b) can persist into later life, and (c) is associated with severe consequences. The current study examined the sequencing of substances relative to inhalants and the post-initiation correlates of inhalant use between youth and young adulthood in nationally representative Add Health data. Analyses examined the relationship of substance of initiation to use of other substances, as well as an examination of the relationship between substance use and consequences. The analyses suggest that (a) those initiating their substance use careers with inhalants often go on to use hard drugs, (b) inhalant use likely occurs after alcohol and marijuana use, and (c) inhalant use during adolescence was associated with health and criminal consequences in both adolescence and young adulthood. (Published Abstract)
  Main Term(s): Juvenile drug use
  Index Term(s): Marijuana ; Hallucinogens ; Drug effects ; Behavior patterns ; Alcohol abuse
  Sponsoring Agency: National Institute on Drug Abuse
United States of America
  Grant Number: 3R01DA015966-05S1
  Publisher URL: http://baywood.com 
  Type: Report (Study/Research)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=264758

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