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NCJ Number: NCJ 175657     Find in a Library
Title: Annual Report on Cocaine Use Among Arrestees, 1998
Series: NIJ Research Report
Author(s): D Hunt ; P Newton ; K Carrigan ; S Kuck ; Q McMullen ; C Putnam ; W Rhodes ; T Rich ; G Yacoubian ; S Young
Corporate Author: Abt Associates, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1999
Page Count: 27
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: Text PDF 
Type: Report (Annual/Periodic)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report presents 1998 data on cocaine use among arrestees, based on the findings from arrestee drug testing under the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program (ADAM).
Abstract: Currently, 35 urban sites participate in the ADAM program. Twelve of the 35 sites were new to the ADAM data system in 1998; and, for many, these reports represent the first look at rates of cocaine use in arrestee populations. In 1998 the percentage of adult male respondents who tested positive for recent (past 72 hours) cocaine use in the ADAM program ranged from a high of 51.3 percent in Atlanta to a low of 8.0 percent in San Jose. For the 32 sites that collected data on female arrestees during 1998, cocaine-positive rates ranged from 67.0 percent in New York City to 9.5 percent in San Jose. Generally, older adults (age 31 and older), whether male or female, were the most likely to use cocaine. Among male cocaine users, recent crack use was self- reported almost twice as frequently as recent powder use. Among female cocaine users, crack use was typically self-reported more than four times as often as powder cocaine use. Taken collectively, these findings suggest that the cocaine epidemic continues to vary in intensity by community, gender, age, and other factors. Although cocaine use may be stabilizing, it is doing so at an unacceptably high level among ADAM arrestees. The arrested population continues to have extensive involvement with both crack and powder cocaine. The need for strategies aimed at reducing crack-cocaine use among females continues to exist. 5 tables and 8 references
Main Term(s): Drug use
Index Term(s): Cocaine ; Pretrial drug testing ; Drug Use Forecasting system
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=175657

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