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NCJ Number: NCJ 184576   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
Title: Next Millennium Conference: Ending Domestic Violence; What We Know About Domestic Violence
Author(s): Lori Heise ; Nanette Benbow ; Eileen Luna
Corporate Author: Vickii Coffey & Associates, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 2000
Page Count: 51
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 1999-WT-VX-0002
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Type: Conference Material
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: A panel discusses various issues that pertain to methodologies for obtaining information on domestic violence and what some current research has determined about domestic violence.
Abstract: One panel member discusses the importance of collaboration between researchers and practitioners in obtaining and organizing information on domestic violence. Practitioners have direct contact with the problem and can thus provide experiential knowledge about the population and the problems with which they interact and confront daily. Researchers must gain knowledge from practitioners before they can begin to design research that is appropriate and productive for the field of practice. Another panel member speaks from experience in conducting cross-cultural studies of domestic violence. Such studies have found that domestic violence exists in all cultures, and the common factor in abusive relationships is the need of the abuser to exert control over the partner. Cultures foster abuse through values and conditioning that promotes control and power as a central feature of masculinity. A third panel member discusses research on Native American tribal domestic violence programs. Problems in gaining support for such programs among tribal leaders are identified and discussed.
Main Term(s): Female victims
Index Term(s): Data collection devices ; Data collection ; Victim services ; Researcher subject relations ; Domestic assault ; NIJ grant-related documents
Note: Proceedings of the Next Millennium Conference: Ending Domestic Violence
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=184576

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