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NCJ Number: NCJ 207326     Find in a Library
Title: American Indian Suicides in Jail: Can Risk Screening Be Culturally Sensitive?
Author(s): Margaret Severson ; Christine W. Duclos
Corporate Author: University of Kansas, School of Social Welfare
United States of America

University of Colorado Health Sciences Ctr
United States of America
Date Published: 06/2005
Page Count: 12
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 99-IJ-CX-0016
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article presents findings on a study concerning the high number of American Indian suicides in a Northern Plains State jail.
Abstract: In 1999, the jail administrator of a facility serving an area with a dominant American Indian population noticed an unusually high level of suicidal behavior. Researchers conducted a 2-year study of the jail and its inmates between 1999 and 2001 to discover the cause of the high rate of suicidal behaviors in the jail. During the first year, participants were 677 inmates who completed a survey measuring their risk level for suicide. Seven focus groups were also conducted with 42 inmates to review the jail’s risk assessment procedure. In the second year, 742 inmates were surveyed about the openness of their responses to the jail’s risk assessment procedure and how comfortable they felt with the process. The findings revealed that discomfort about the interview process and answering questions pertaining to alcohol and drugs, health, and mental illness prevented inmates from being candid with the interviewer. These results suggested the need for the jail to redesign its risk assessment process to tailor it to the cultural backgrounds of the inmate population. It is recommended that the experiences of the American Indian population should be used to design a culturally sensitive risk assessment procedure. Limitations of the study are discussed. Notes
Main Term(s): Needs assessment ; Inmate suicide
Index Term(s): American Indians ; Ethnic groups ; Cultural influences ; Sensitivity training
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=207326

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