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NCJ Number: 224859 Find in a Library
Title: Young People and Crime: Findings From the 2006 Offending, Crime and Justice Survey
Author(s): Stephen Roe; Jane Ashe
Date Published: July 2008
Page Count: 34
Sponsoring Agency: Great Britain Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate
London, SW1H 9AT, England
Publication Number: ISBN 978 1 84726 755 9
Sale Source: Great Britain Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate
Information and Publications Group
Room 201
50 Queen Anne's Gate
London, SW1H 9AT,
United Kingdom
Document: PDF
Type: Statistics
Format: Book (Softbound)
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: This report presents findings from the 2006 Offending, Crime and Justice Survey (OCJS) examining the levels and trends in youth offending, antisocial behavior, and victimization among young people in England and Wales.
Abstract: The findings from the 2006 Offending, Crime and Justice Survey (OCJS) showed that the majority of young people were law-abiding. Additional highlights include: (1) there has been no change in levels of offending since the survey started in 2003; (2) those who offended were also likely to commit antisocial behavior; (3) offenders were also more likely to be victims; (4) being noisy or rude in public (13 percent) and behaving in a way that caused a neighbor to complain (11 percent) were the most common antisocial behaviors committed; and (5) the peak age of offending was 14 to 17. This report presents major findings from the 2006 OCJS. It focuses on levels and trends in youth offending, antisocial behavior, and victimization among young people aged from 10 to 25 living in private households in England and Wales. Tables, figures
Main Term(s): Juvenile offense statistics
Index Term(s): Antisocial attitudes; Deviance; England; Foreign juvenile delinquency; Juvenile delinquency; Juvenile Delinquent behavior; Juvenile offender statistics; Juvenile offenders; Juvenile statistics; United Kingdom (UK); Victimization; Wales
Note: Home Office Statistical Bulletin, 09/08; downloaded November 24, 2008.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=246836

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