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NCJ Number: NCJ 226811   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
Title: Determination of the Age (Time Since Deposition) of a Biological Stain
Author(s): Jack Ballantyne Ph.D.
Date Published: 08/2008
Page Count: 84
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2005-MU-BX-K071
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Type: Report (Study/Research) ; Report (Technical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined changes to hemoglobin spectral profiles, changes in enzymatic activity, and degradation to RNA in order to determine the time since deposition (TSD) or the age of dried bloodstains.
Abstract: The study observed a previously unidentified hypsochromic shift (shift to shorter wavelengths) of the Soret band of hemoglobin, which allowed for distinguishing the differing age of bloodstains by minutes, hours, days, weeks, and months. The resolution and sensitivity of this method makes it particularly suited for use with forensic casework bloodstains. In addition, the loss of activity for six enzyme candidates was used to determine the age of dried bloodstains. Although this method was limited to determining month differences in bloodstain age, it provided initial support for the use of changes in enzyme activity in determining the age of a stain. Additional enzyme candidates may be identified that could improve the preciseness of this method. Initial work focused on examining degradation to mRNA in dried bloodstains, specifically the measurement of a progressive increase in the amount of degradation, so as to determine the time since deposition; however, all RNA-based methods provided inconsistent results and were therefore unsuccessful. The descriptions of materials and methods address the preparation of body fluid stains, environmental samples, humidity studies, RNA isolation, DNase I digestion, RNA quantitation, cDNA synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis, protein extraction and quantitation, UV-visible spectroscopy, and enzyme activity assays. 23 figures, 6 tables, 47 references, and appended listings of related presentations and publications
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Biological influences ; Time of death determination ; Forensics/Forensic Sciences ; Investigative techniques ; Time of offense determination ; Blood stains ; NIJ final report
   
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https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=248810

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