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NCJ Number: NCJ 243535     Find in a Library
Title: CCPIO New Media and the Courts Report 2013
  Document URL: PDF 
Author(s): Christopher J. Davey ; Carol Taylor
Corporate Author: National Ctr for State Courts
United States of America

Conference of Court Public Information Officers (CCPIO)
United States of America

E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University
United States of America
Date Published: 08/2013
Page Count: 33
  Annotation: This report presents the results of a survey examining how the use of new media has affected the courts through the eyes of judges and court personnel.
Abstract: This report from the Conference of Court Public Information Officers (CCPIO) presents the results of a survey that examined how the use of new media has affected courts as seen through the eyes of judges and court personnel. Highlights of the survey’s findings include the following: the courts’ use of Facebook declined slightly in 2013 to 11.3 percent from a high of 13.2 percent in 2012; Twitter and Facebook were the most popular tools among courts; 45 States and the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico have all developed a courtroom policy regulating at least one social media tool; and most respondents agreed that mobile devices should be prohibited from courtrooms, while a large percentage believed that the general public and litigants should not be permitted to silently communicate in any way from the courtroom. Additional findings cover the presence of traditional media in the courtroom and individual professional use of social media. This survey was conducted by the CCPIO to determine the extent to which the use of new forms of social media had affected the operation of courts and how judges and court personnel feel about these changes. The survey asked judges and court personnel in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico about their experiences with new media in the courtroom and how this use has changed the administration of justice. A total of 1,550 judges and court personnel responded to the survey which was sent via email to individuals in the National Center for State Courts email distribution system. The findings from the survey indicate that new forms of social media in the courtroom continue to present challenges to judges and court personnel as they work to protect the integrity of the criminal justice system. Tables, figures, and appendixes
Main Term(s): Social Media
Index Term(s): Appellate courts ; Court administrators ; Judges ; Court reporting ; Court structure ; Court personnel ; Court rules ; Court management ; Courtroom proceedings broadcasting ; Court procedures ; Public Opinion of the Courts ; Court personnel attitudes
Sale Source: Conference of Court Public Information Officers (CCPIO)
c/o Public Information Officer
U.S. Supreme Court
Washington, DC United States of America
Type: Survey
Country: United States of America
Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=265612

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