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NCJ Number: 136575 Find in a Library
Title: Licit and Illicit Drug Patterns and Problems Among Kibbutz Young Adults
Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health  Volume:12  Issue:6  Dated:(September 1991)  Pages:421-426
Author(s): R E Isralowitz
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 6
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Substance abuse was investigated for a sample population of 156 young people between 18 and 25 years of age from 7 kibbutzim in the southern region of Israel.
Abstract: The study instrument included questions on background and demographic characteristics and items related to alcohol, illegal drug, and cigarette smoking patterns and problems. Additional questions were asked concerning achievement in high school, self-concept, attitudes toward the military and kibbutz life, peer and parental regulations, level of recreational activities, and substance use patterns of parents. Of the 156 respondents, 116 or 74 percent reported never using an illegal substance. Of the 40 young people who tried illicit drugs, only 1 reported using a substance other than hashish or marijuana. For those reporting the use of illicit drugs, 50 percent did so with friends and acquaintances not from the kibbutz where they resided. Beer was the most popular alcoholic substance used, while cigarette smoking was reported by 64 or 41 percent. Data tended to support the sociological perspective of substance use and abuse. Parent smoking and drinking appeared to be catalysts for tobacco and alcohol use among children. 20 references and 4 tables
Main Term(s): Drug use; Young Adults (18-24)
Index Term(s): Crime in foreign countries; Israel; Juvenile drug abusers; Parental influence; Tobacco use
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=136575

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