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NCJ Number: 148217 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Study of Tribal and Alaska Native Juvenile Justice Systems, Final Report
Corporate Author: American Indian Law Ctr Inc
.
United States of America

Walter R. McDonald and Associates, Inc.
United States of America
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 305
Sponsoring Agency: American Indian Law Ctr Inc
Albuquerque, NM 87196
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC 20531
Walter R. McDonald and Associates, Inc.
Rockville, MD 20852-1698
Contract Number: 90-JN-CX-K002
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

American Indian Law Ctr Inc
.
P.O. Box 4456
Station A
Albuquerque, NM 87196
United States of America

Walter R. McDonald and Associates, Inc.
12300 Twinbrook Parkway
Suite 310
Rockville, MD 20852-1698
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report describes the extent to which Alaskan native tribes and organizations are in compliance with three major requirements of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act: deinstitutionalization, separation, and jail removal.
Abstract: To examine government functions administered by Indian tribes and Alaskan native villages with respect to juveniles under their jurisdiction, data were obtained from various sources relevant to tribal juvenile justice. A mail questionnaire was sent to all federally recognized tribes, pueblos, and villages, and individual and group interviews were conducted with key leaders. According to U.S. Census data, 266,171 Indians under 18 years of age lived on reservations or tribal trust lands in 1990; 74 percent resided in tribes and villages participating in the study. Among the 19,242 Alaskan native juveniles, 32 percent lived in villages participating in the study. Study results showed that many tribes need technical assistance and Federal funding to develop data systems for courts and youth-serving agencies. Tribal courts represent an important part of tribal juvenile justice systems. Existing courts vary in size, funding, and procedures, and tribal legal codes guide the practice of courts in handling juvenile cases and determining the framework within which youth and family rights are protected. The study identifies weaknesses and strengths of tribal juvenile justice systems, notes the complex legal environment in which such systems operate, and discusses the role of Federal funding. Model programs operated for tribal youth and their families are described, and recommendations to improve the operation of tribal juvenile justice systems are offered. Appendixes contain the study instruments, an analysis of enabling legislation, and intergovernmental agreements. References, endnotes, and tables
Main Term(s): State juvenile justice systems
Index Term(s): Alaska; American Indians; Family courts; Indian justice; Juvenile courts; Tribal court system
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148217

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