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NCJ Number: 152383 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Creating Caring Communities: Blueprint for an Effective Federal Policy on Child Abuse and Neglect
Author(s): B D Metrikin-Gold; E H Lohr; G B Melton; H A Davidson
Corporate Author: US Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 279
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect
Washington, DC 20201
US Dept of Health and Human Services
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

US Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect
200 Independence Ave., S.W.
Washington, DC 20201
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The 1991 report of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect focuses on the nature of the Federal Government's response to child maltreatment.
Abstract: The report presents a composite description of maltreated children and their families and discusses changes in the Federal response to child abuse and neglect. The report notes that, despite the emphasis on protecting children, hundreds of thousands of children are starved, abandoned, burned, severely beaten, raped, sodomized, berated, and belittled each year. An estimated 2.5 million cases of suspected child abuse and neglect are reported yearly, and direct and indirect costs of such maltreatment are enormous. The U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect recommends that the child protection system be enhanced at all levels, including law enforcement, education, public health, mental health, courts, and private nonprofit agencies and organizations. Further, the Federal role in child protection should be comprehensive yet flexible. Six broad recommendations for change are offered: (1) develop and implement a national child protection policy; (2) prevent and reduce child maltreatment by strengthening neighborhoods and families; (3) provide a new focus on child abuse and neglect that strengthens families; (4) enhance Federal efforts related to generating, applying, and disseminating knowledge about child protection; (5) improve coordination among Federal, State, tribal, and private sector child protection efforts; and (6) implement a new Federal initiative aimed at preventing child maltreatment that pilots universal, voluntary neonatal home visitation. The Federal Government's performance in child protection is assessed, and the legislative history of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) is reviewed. Additional information on recommendations of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect and the text of the CAPTA are appended. Footnotes
Main Term(s): Juvenile victims
Index Term(s): Abused children; Child abuse prevention; Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act; Child protection services; Child victims; Juvenile dependency and neglect
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=152383

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