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NCJ Number: 210339 Find in a Library
Title: Policing, Crime and Public Health: Lessons for Australia From the "New York Miracle"
Journal: Criminal Justice  Volume:5  Issue:2  Dated:May 2005  Pages:115-143
Author(s): David Dixon; Lisa Maher
Date Published: May 2005
Page Count: 29
Publisher: http://crj.sagepub.com/ 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article examines the transfer of criminal justice policies between Australia and the United States through specific example, the influence of New York City policing in Australia with particular reference to Sydney.
Abstract: Within the criminal justice system, the United States and Australia transfer, share, and exchange concepts, policies, and rhetoric. This article examines specific examples in the area of policing where borrowed or adapted United States strategies found fertile soil in Australia: (1) the crime control strategies developed in New York City in the 1990s credited with reducing crime rates and (2) international developments in policing impacting the heroin market. The article is divided into three parts: (1) criminological relations between Australia and the United State is placed in historical context; (2) an assessment of some lessons that can be learned by Australian policing from New York are provided; and (3) a case study of American influences on the policing of an Australian heroin market is examined. Within the content of the article, how the transfer of policies are implemented, how elements of them may conflict, and how the crucial transfer may be more about specific perceptions and attitudes are identified. The specific United States policies and strategies which were borrowed and adapted since the mid-1990s found fertile soil in Australia. References
Main Term(s): International Law Enforcement Cooperation
Index Term(s): Australia; Foreign police; Police effectiveness; Police policy development; Policing innovation; United States of America
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=210339

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