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NCJ Number: 242828 Find in a Library
Title: Mechanisms of Association Between Paternal Alcoholism and Abuse of Alcohol and Other Illicit Drugs Among Adolescents
Journal: Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse  Volume:22  Issue:2  Dated:April - June 2013  Pages:133-149
Author(s): Neta Peleg-Oren; Michelle Hospital; Staci Leon Morris; Eric F. Wagner
Date Published: April 2013
Page Count: 17
Sponsoring Agency: US Dept of Health and Human Services
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
Grant Number: R01 AA10246
Document: HTML
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the effect of paternal alcohol problems on adolescent use of alcohol and other illicit drugs as a function of maternal communication, as well as adolescent social and coping skills.
Abstract: The current study examines the effect of paternal alcohol problems on adolescent use of alcohol and other illicit drugs as a function of maternal communication, as well as adolescent social and coping skills (N = 145). Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses indicated that adolescents with a paternal history of alcohol problems reported higher levels of problematic communication with their mothers than did adolescents with fathers who were light drinkers or who were non-drinkers. Moreover, problematic maternal communication functioned as a partial mediator for both adolescent negative social skills and self-blame coping skills. Adolescents who reported using self-blame coping skills more frequently also tended to use alcohol more frequently. Findings suggest that these high-risk adolescents might need more intensive and targeted social and psychological services in their schools and communities. Abstract published by arrangement with Taylor and Francis.
Main Term(s): Children of alcoholics
Index Term(s): Juvenile drug abusers; Juvenile social adjustment; Parent-Child Relations; Parental influence; Underage Drinking
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=264903

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