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NCJ Number: 250797 Find in a Library
Title: Confronting Online Extremism - The Effect of Self-Help, Collective Efficacy, and Guardianship on Being a Target for Hate Speech
Journal: Social Science Computer Review  Dated:September 2016
Author(s): M. Costello; J. Hawdon; T. N. Ratliff
Date Published: September 2016
Page Count: 0
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2014-ZA-BX-0014
Document: HTML
Type: Report (Grant Sponsored); Report (Study/Research); Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article; Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In order to determine who is likely to be a target of online hate and extremism, this study used an online survey (N = 963) of youth and young adults recruited from a demographically balanced sample of Americans.
Abstract: The study adapted routine activity theory in distinguishing between actor-initiated social control (i.e., self-help), other-initiated social control (i.e., collective efficacy), and guardianship and shows how self-help is positively related to the likelihood of being targeted by hate. The findings highlight how online exposure to hate materials, target suitability, and enacting social control online all influence being the target of hate. Using social networking sites and encountering hate material online have a particularly strong relationship with being targeted with victim suitability (e.g., discussing private matters online, participating in hate online) and confronting hate also influencing the likelihood of being the target of hate speech. 76 references (Publisher abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Victimization risk
Index Term(s): Computer related crime; Crime specific countermeasures; Cyber bullying; Cyber Terrorism; Hate Crimes; National Institute of Justice (NIJ); NIJ grant-related documents
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=272975

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