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NCJ Number: 113462 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Attitudes of New York Legislators Toward Crime and Criminal Justice: A Report of the State Legislator Survey, 1985
Author(s): T J Flanagan; E F McGarrell
Corporate Author: Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Ctr
State University of New York at Albany
United States of America
Date Published: 1986
Page Count: 45
Sponsoring Agency: Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Ctr
Albany, NY 12222
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Ctr
State University of New York at Albany
135 Western Avenue
Albany, NY 12222
United States of America
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: A mail questionnaire survey was conducted of New York State legislators to examine their attitudes toward crime causation, severity, and control issues and to examine their support of several specific criminal justice policies.
Abstract: Of 211 legislators, 105 returned useable responses. Overall, legislators' views were diverse, complex, and multidimensional. A majority of respondents viewed crime as the result of a breakdown of discipline in society, but they also viewed crime as a product of failings in the social structure. A majority agreed that reestablishing traditional values and expanding social programs provide ways to reduce crime. On goals of imprisonment, 87 percent agreed with a deserts rationale, 79 percent with an incapacitation rationale, and 60 to 63 percent with a deterrence rationale. Despite support for long sentences, 57 percent felt community corrections should be expanded, while 43 percent felt rehabilitation doesn't work, and 59 percent agreed that criminals should not be viewed as victims of society, yet 58 percent felt that rehabilitation was as important as punishment. With respect to juveniles, 92 percent agreed with rehabilitative goals, two-thirds advocated diversion, and 63 percent felt violent juvenile offenders should be subject to adult penalties. A majority of legislators favored capital punishment, expansion of the prison system, and greater use of community alternatives over institutionalization. Lawmakers were divided on support for gun control and determinate sentences. Survey form, 10 tables, and 8 references.
Main Term(s): Criminal justice system policy
Index Term(s): Corrections policies; Crime control policies; New York; Public Opinion of Corrections
Note: Working Paper 26
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=113462

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