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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 114043 Find in a Library
Title: Organizing for Small Business Crime Prevention
Corporate Author: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America

National Crime Prevention Council
United States of America
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Assistance
Washington, DC 20531
Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Washington, DC 20531
National Crime Prevention Council
Arlington, VA 22202-4801
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article outlines strategies and basic steps in crime prevention work with small businesses.
Abstract: Helping business communities develop a crime prevention program is similar to helping neighborhood residents with this task. Some organizing techniques are to approach businesses through their perceptions of crime problems, their sense that crime is costing them money, and their overall business needs. Business people should take responsibility for program leadership, planning, resource development, communication, and operation, with crime-prevention practitioners providing support and technical assistance. Planning for small business crime prevention involves needs assessment, planning, resource acquisition, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation. One strategy is to form a Business Watch similar to Neighborhood Watch, whereby businesses look out for one another as well as themselves. Possible partners in an organized approach to crime prevention are Chambers of Commerce, business associations, service clubs, special interest associations/groups, government agencies, private security, and community associations. Some issues in business crime prevention are reduction in the fear of crime, commercial burglary prevention, and robbery prevention. Crime prevention for businesses can be enhanced through businesses' cooperation with and contributions to the community. Examples of effective business crime prevention programs are provided. 31 resource listings.
Main Term(s): Business security
Index Term(s): Crime prevention measures; Crime specific countermeasures
Note: From 'Topics in Crime Prevention.'
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=114043

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