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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 115193 Find in a Library
Title: Electronically Monitored Home Confinement in Illinois
Author(s): R Przybylski
Corporate Author: Michigan Law Review Assoc
United States of America
Editor(s): M Hickey
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: Michigan Law Review Assoc
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: Michigan Law Review Assoc
Hutchins Hall
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Description
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In recent years, supervision officials have begun using electronic monitoring devices as a tool for the more effective and efficient supervision of individuals placed in home confinement.
Abstract: Because prison overcrowding in the 1980's created an unprecedented need for alternatives to incarceration, interest in this option has increased. In 1987, at least 53 programs in 21 States were using some form of electronically monitored home confinement. In Illinois, two counties have implemented four such programs. All four programs use continuously signalling systems to monitor the arrival and departure of an offender at a particular location, 24 hours a day. All include strict eligibility criteria, use telephone lines for monitoring, and include a supervision component or other conditions of confinement. The programs are variously administered by the Sheriff's Office, the Department of Court Services, and the Probation Department. The individuals monitored in these programs include work releasees, pretrial releasees, intensive probationers, and other probationers. While these programs have been successful, the future effectiveness and potential of electronic monitoring of home confinement will depend on the resolution of related legal issues and an assessment of its financial and social costs and benefits. 17 notes.
Main Term(s): House arrest
Index Term(s): Electronic surveillance; Home detention; Illinois
Note: Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority Advisory, July 1988
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=115193

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