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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 118741 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: What Will Be the Impact of Missing Children Cases on Law Enforcement by the Year 1998?
Author(s): J Griggs
Corporate Author: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
United States of America
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 77
Sponsoring Agency: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
Sacramento, CA 95816
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Publication Number: 6-0095
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

POST Media Distribution Ctr
1601 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Best Practice/State-of-the-Art Review
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Trends and events potentially impacting missing children cases by the year 1998 are assessed.
Abstract: The research group identified five trends relevant to the missing children issue: need for better children awareness and education programs; law enforcement accountability; legislation related to missing children; lack of communication between agencies dealing with missing children cases; and increase in the organized crime network. The research group then developed a list of events that could affect trends in the number of missing children. These events include the formation of a missing children task force, demand by victim rights groups that more attention and resources be devoted to missing children cases, publicity of a major missing child case, change in law enforcement's view of missing children, and more public and private funding for missing children programs. A strategic management process was formulated to address the missing children issue. It is concluded that legislative interest in missing children programs has diminished and that involved agencies interact poorly with each other regarding missing children cases. Law enforcement administrators need appropriate training in child pornography, educational programs, and missing children investigative techniques. Legislatures need to be made more aware of the issue, and State-level agencies need to be involved in assessing and planning for the special problems posed by missing children cases. Appendixes provide additional information on the research project. 23 references, 11 figures.
Main Term(s): Missing children
Index Term(s): Child protection services; Juvenile justice employment/expenditure data
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=118741

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